How to say Goodbye at Work

I am changing jobs this weekend and so it has been a week of goodbyes (with an exciting week of hellos coming, I’m sure).

Leaving a place you have worked for almost 10 years is pretty big, so saying a proper farewell to the colleagues with who I have worked closely for so long is important to me, and therefore I also spent some time thinking about the best exit speech to use in various situations. And since this job change has been coming for some time, I have also had time to think about the best possible lines to say/write.

First of all there has times when I just wanted to slam the door or call in sick a few days before my final workday and let that be it, but while that may be satisfying in the very moment you do it, that would be such a waste of opportunity and I am sure I would spend years afterwards wishing I had said something clever instead. For example, when a colleague of mine picked a shorter straw in a rightsizing exercise, he demonstrated some greatness of mind by stating “this was not the promotion I had hoped for” – not bad in such a moment, and much better to be remembered for, instead of just being the angry guy (even when it is justified, and I have been there too) or the guy who didn’t care about the friends form work. I don’t think there is  a “do nothing option”, even if you don’t feel like saying anything. People do notice and whatever you may think, there is almost always someone that care.

Starting from nothing there is a wide spectrum of things to do instead. My job is pretty straightforward with limited drama and absolutely no public interest, so there will never be epic poems, roman à clef‘s or Netflix series written about it (and we already have Dilbert and ‘The Office‘ in two incarnations to cover most of the general absurdity of office and IT work), so a few, well selected lines is what it should be, and it is tempting to look for a good quote to either use straight out of the box, quote to paraphrase for extra impact with the initiated and sometime just to be heavily inspired by.

Quotes, however, come with issues. I.e., quotes have context. So even if the words are cool, then the entire thing will fall flat if the recipients don’t know where it is taken from and what it originally meant, unless is is great enough to stand without its source.

Consider “hasta la vista, baby!” which quotes Arnold Schwarzenegger in “Terminator 2 – Judgement Day”. The movie is from 1991 and you can no longer count on people around you having seen it, so the line may make little sense. However, to those who know the source, the undertone of impending violence make this line problematic as well. Saying something like that to people, will make them wonder what do you actually mean?? The same goes for “I’ll be back“. Very Terminator, not a nice promise to make to those who gets the line and pointless to everyone else.

Or the conversation that includes the excellent line: “This conversation can serve no purpose anymore. Goodbye.” It doesn’t end well for the entity who said it in 2001 A Space Odyssey.

so long and thanks for all the fish” – if you are familiar with the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy you will recognize this as the last goodbye from the Dolphins just before Earths destruction to make way for a bypass. To everyone else it must be gibberish and just seem arrogant. To the few initiated, it will it is nicely nerdy, but most likely arrogant as well (noting that the book makes a point out of Dolphins being more clever than humans). I actually used that greeting once myself, happily intending to be slightly nerdy and slightly arrogant; probably the greeting just landed me in a “meh” bucket and I was forgotten so much faster. I didn’t appreciated that at the time, but thinking back, I would have said something else.

“this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship” – is also a great line, the very last from Casablanca – a movie with an absolutely marvelous script and it is hard to resist borrowing good lines if they fit. But then again – the context of exiles and expatriates in Morocco during World War 2’s Vichy regime should be used with care.

For a while I was inspired by Rutger Hauer’s final words in Blade Runner, though I might have changed the original “time to die” into “time to leave”. I even tested it out at a small reception held in my honor, with fair results (speaking face to face with a small group allows you to make adjustment to the presentation) and I considered this:

We have seen things that others would not believe
Great things, small things, things best forgotten. Even C-beams glittering in the dark.
Because we remember now, none of this will be lost in time (like tears in the rain).
Time to leave.

Interesting salute if you know the background, but once more the context problematic (no spoilers though : ). Also, a reference to ships on fire would actually be bad taste in my particular case.

So while to the initiated, a quote immediately call on imagery from great movies, with great characters saying great things, but even then the context of the movie won’t fit well with the present situation and leaving with a quote is only good if the quote can stand for itself, since you can’t rely on people knowing the source of the quote (or even that it is a quote).

This is what I wrote in the end:

Dear Colleagues (current and former)

Today was my last day working for the company after almost 10 years.

Thanks you all for the time we have shared together and great stuff we achieved.

I wish you all the best going forward.

Best regards,
Allan

Not the most brilliant or most exciting perhaps, but no one will even suspect hidden meanings or symbolism, and I am pretty sure that I or anyone I know will never be embarrassed by it.

Featured image

Very apropos the topic of the post, the featured image is a sunset, the photo taken this summer in Thy, Northern Jutland. Such beautiful light up there.